DOLPHINS





#DOLPHINPETITIONS 
PLEASE #SPEAKFORDOLPHINS


http://oceanshepherd.blogspot.com/p/dolphins.html

Thank you, Esperanca Azevedo for the beautiful photo









CHALLENGE THE DOLPHINARIA INDUSTRY
http://www.bornfree.org.uk/get-involved/campaigning/petitions/dolphinaria-petition/








DECLARATION OF RIGHTS 
FOR CETACEANS: 
WHALES AND DOLPHINS
http://www.cetaceanrights.org/






THE COVE: SIGN THE PETITION TO HELP SAVE JAPAN'S DOLPHINS
http://www.takepart.com/cove/takeaction






CAPTIVITY IS CRUEL 
 DON'T GO TO A SHOW!
Dr. Gerald Dick: Executive Director WAZA 
via SaveJapanDolphins
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/5/stop-dolphin-captivity/










STOP THE DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER 
IN TAIJI, JAPAN
author: SaveJapanDolphins.org
target: WAZA Executive Director, Gerald Dick









Petitioning Dr. Gerald Dick 
WAZA: $TOP $UPPORTING TAIJI'$ DOLPHIN $LAUGHTER AND EXPEL THE TAIJI WHALE MUSEUM IMMEDIATELY !!






Petitioning Dr.Jorg Junhold 
WAZA & IMATA: $top $upporting the dolphin $laughter in Taiji
https://www.change.org/petitions/waza-imata-top-upporting-the-dolphin-laughter-in-taiji






Petitioning Shelley Woods 
IMATA TRAINERS: DON'T TRAIN TAIJI DOLPHINS!
http://www.change.org/petitions/imata-trainers-don-t-train-taiji-dolphins








Petitioning Mr Kazutaka Sangen 
CANCEL PLANS TO 
BUILD A DOLPHIN ZOO IN TAIJI 
http://www.change.org/petitions/cancel-plans-to-build-a-dolphin-zoo-in-taiji









STOP MARINE DOLPHIN PARK IN TAIJI, JAPAN
Taiji Mayor Kazutaka Sangen, Governor of Wakayama Mr. Yoshiki Kimura
via Animal Advocates
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/418/811/027/stop-marine-dolphin-park-in-taija-japan/











Petitioning Embassy of Japan in Denmark
STOP THE DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER 
IN JAPAN








Petitioning The Right Honourable John Key MP, Prime Minister of New Zealand 
The Right Honourable John Key MP, Prime Minister of New Zealand: PLEASE HELP GET CITES TO END THE TRADE IN DOLPHINS FROM TAIJI IN JAPAN






Petitioning UK Prime Minister
END TAIJI SLAUGHTER OF DOLPHINS





Petitioning Broome City Council
BROOME CITY COUNCIL: SAY NO TO TAIJI






Petitioning BBC 
BBC - TAKE A CREW TO TAIJI





Petitioning Sky News LONDON 
Sky News LONDON news@sky.com: 
COVER AND UPDATE WHAT IS HAPPENING IN TAIJI, JAPAN







Petitioning 
NHK World Broadcasting Corporation: 
RESEARCH WHAT IS GOING ON 
IN TAIJI, WAKAYAMA 
AND BROADCAST WHAT YOU FIND.




Petitioning Yahoo 
Yahoo: STOP SELLING DOLPHIN 
AND WHALE MEAT




Impose Ecomonic Sanctions against Japanese Government: 
ENFORCE PELLY AMENDMENT CERTIFICATIONS
by Stephen Hambrik








Petitioning International Whaling Commission
INTERNATIONAL WHALING COMMISSION: PROTECT THE DOLPHINS! 
https://www.change.org/petitions/international-whaling-commission-protect-the-dolphins








Petitioning International Whaling Commission 
INTERNATIONAL WHALING COMMISSION: PROVIDE PROTECTION AGAINST THE KILLING OF DEFENSELESS DOLPHINS 








HELP STOP THE KILLINGS OF 20,000 DOLPHINS AND PORPOISES 
IN TAIJI, JAPAN EACH YEAR 
target: British and Japanese Government 


















HELP SAVE THE TAIJI DOLPHINS!






Petitioning Joji Morishita and the fishermen STOP SLAUGHTERING DOLPHINS 
IN TAIJI 

 PROTEST 
YEARLY DOLPHIN KILLINGS IN JAPAN





Petitioning Dolphin Base Resort
STOP THE ANNUAL SLAUGHTER OF DOLPHINS 
http://www.change.org/petitions/stop-the-annual-slaughter-of-dolphins





Petitioning Jennifer Stalzer 
TELL MASTERCARD: STOP SUPPORTING THE LIVE DOLPHIN TRADE





Petitioning Sandra Munoz, Manager Crisis Communications & Operations Media Relations 
FedEx: STOP TRANSPORTING LIVE MARINE MAMMALS FOR THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY




CAPTIVE DOLPHIN PETITIONS











DON'T LET THEM BUILD THE NEW MOSCOW DOLPHINARIUM, CONTAINING ORCA, BELUGAS AND DOLPHINS FROM JAPAN






OPPOSE NEW DOLPHIN SWIM FACILITIES IN THE BAHAMAS
Thank you James Gordon :)








Petitioning SeaWorld: SEAWORLD: 
STOP DOLPHIN AND WHALE SHOWS !!!! 
http://www.change.org/petitions/seaworld-stop-dolphin-and-whale-shows









Petitioning Dr. Ing H. Fauzi Bowo 
DOLPHINS DON'T BELONG IN TRAVELING CIRCUS
http://www.change.org/petitions/dolphins-don-t-belong-in-traveling-circus









Petitioning Proprietor(s) of Disney World 
FREE THE DISNEY DOLPHINS






Petitioning The Governor of NV 
NO MORE DOLPHINS SWIMMING IN 
LAS VEGAS 






 CLOSE THE DOLPHIN DEATH POOL AT THE MIRAGE IN LAS VEGAS







 STOP MISTREATMENT OF SEA ANIMALS IN CANADIAN AQUARIUM








Petitioning Dienst "Dierenwelzijn en CITES" 
COMPLETION AND CLOSING DOLPHINS PARK IN BOUDEWIJN SEAPARK BRUGGE BELGIUM





Petitioning Indonesian authority officials/Autoridades de Indonesia:
CLOSE DOWN INDONESIAN DOLPHIN TRAVELING CIRCUS 
http://www.change.org/petitions/indonesian-authority-officials-autoridades-de-indonesia-close-down-indonesian-dolphin-traveling-circus






Petitioning Mr. Arias Canete 
MR. ARIA CAPETE: PUT AN END TO DOLPHIN AND ORCA SHOWS IN SPANISH DOLPHINARIA 
http://www.change.org/petitions/spanish-minister-for-the-environment-put-an-end-to-dolphin-and-orca-shows-in-spanish-dolphinaria







Petitioning Lisbeth Berg-Hansen 
ALL DOLPHINARIA MUST BE 
CLOSED IN EUROPE!










SAY NO TO A NEW DOLPHINARIUM 
IN UKRAINE! (KYIV ZOO)
http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Say_NO_to_a_new_dolphinarium_in_Ukraine_Kyiv_Zoo/












Petitioning Commission européenne 
COMMISSION EUROPEENNE: STOP DOLPHIN JAILS








STOP DOLPHIN FACILITY IN MISSISSIPPI








CLOSE DOWN THE WORLD'S LAST CIRCUSES WITH DOLPHINS









Petitioning Ms. Mari Elka Pangestu 
Indonesia's Minister for 
Forestry and Minister for Tourism: 
FACILITATE THE REHABILITATION AND RELEASE OF INDONESIA'S CAPTIVE DOLPHINS.















Petitioning USDA : 
ANIMALS ARE NOT ENTERTAINERS
http://www.change.org/petitions/animals-are-not-entertainers



STOP DOLPHIN EXTINCTION PETITIONS



Petitioning Jose Sarukhan Kermez
PREVENT THE EXTINCTION OF THE VAQUITA PORPOISE ~ THE WORLD'S MOST ENDANGERED MARINE MAMMAL
http://www.change.org/petitions/prevent-the-extinction-of-the-vaquita-porpoise-the-world-s-most-endangered-marine-mammal








SAVE THE IRRAWADDY DOLPHINS 
FROM THE DANGERS OF FISHING 
IN THE MEKONG RIVER
http://forcechange.com/27926/save-the-irrawaddy-dolphins-from-the-dangers-of-fishing-in-the-mekong-river/#gf_1






PAKISTAN PLEASE 
DO NOT EXPLOIT DOLPHINS






 SAVE THE VAQUITA PORPOISE





Petitioning Amy Fraenkel - North America Regional Director 
SAVE THE VAQUITA PORPOISE - 
THE WORLD'S MOST ENDANGERED MARINE MAMMAL






SAVE THE IRRAWADDY DOLPHIN 
FROM EXTINCTION








 HELP PROTECT THE RARE 
AUSTRALIAN SNUBFIN DOLPHIN










 SAVE THE YANGTZE FINLESS 
PORPOISE FROM CERTAIN EXTINCTION







SAVE CHINESE PORPOISES 
FROM EXTINCTION






SAVE THE RARE RIVER DOLPHIN FROM IMMINENT EXTINCTION








 URGE INDIA TO SAVE THE GANGES RIVER DOLPHIN







Petitioning Laura Chinchilla
COSTA RICA: STOP KILLING OSA DOLPHINS AND MAKE A PELAGIC DOLPHIN SUPERPOD PARK 
http://www.change.org/petitions/costa-rica-stop-killing-osa-dolphins-and-make-a-pelagic-dolphin-superpod-park








STOP DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER PETITIONS





Petitioning Jakup Mikkelsen
STOP THE UNNECESSARY SLAUGHTER AND TORTURE OF CALDERON DOLPHINS IN THE FAROE ISLANDS 
http://www.change.org/petitions/stop-the-unnecessary-slaughter-and-torture-of-calderon-dolphins-in-the-faroe-islands






 STOP THE CAPTURE AND TRADE OF DOLPHINS IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS






"OPERATION TRIDENT" 
TO END THE DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER 
IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS








DEMAND ACTION AGAINST DOLPHIN SLAUGHTER IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS
http://forcechange.com/56597/demand-action-against-dolphin-slaughter-in-the-solomon-islands/#gf_1





STOP SEISMIC TESTING PETITIONS







NAVY TO DEAFEN 15,000 WHALES AND DOLPHINS AND KILL 1,000 MORE
http://signon.org/sign/navy-under-water-sound.fb20?source=s.fb&r_by=4615751







Petitioning The US Navy, 
US Department of Defense, Shell Oil 
TELL THE US NAVY AND SHELL OIL TO STOP TESTING HARMFUL ACOUSTIC DEVICES NEAR WHALES AND DOLPHINS!

STOP KILLING DOLPHINS 
WITH SEISMIC TESTING
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/584/078/403/stop-killing-dolphins-with-seismic-testing/





HELP GULF DOLPHINS PETITIONS











Petitioning: Forrest and Charlotte Lucas of Lucas Oil 
 SET THE INDIANAPOLIS ZOO 
DOLPHINS FREE








Petitioning Barbara Kohn 
APHIS, USDA REINSTATE SWIM WITH DOLPHIN PROGRAM REGULATIONS










CANCEL DOLPHIN PERFORMANCE AT SOCHI 2014 OLYMPICS











From Call of the Cove :


The search engines for the petition sites enable current Actions.

As new petitions are added, they can be found immediately here:






Change.org "Dolphin" search: http://www.change.org/petitions#search/dolphin


Care2: "Dolphin" search: http://www.care2.com/find/site#q=dolphin

Forcechange.com"Dolphin" search: http://www.forcechange.com/?s=dolphin

Forcechange.com"Taiji" search: http://forcechange.com/?s=taiji












NO COAL PORTS in the Fitzroy Delta & North Curtis Island Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area
















JAPAN IS HUNTING SOME DOLPHIN SPECIES TO EXTINCTION




November 9.2013
News in the world of whales this week (or close to it), presented by guest blogger Lauren Packard:

The Japanese tradition of killing around 17,000 small cetaceans each year in Japan's coastal waters--made infamous by The Cove's depiction of the Taiji annual dolphin slaughter--is hunting many dolphin and whale species to extinction. Surprised? I'm not. The London-based Environmental Investigation Agency estimates that more than 1 million cetaceans have been killed in Japanese waters in the past 70 years. Japan's self-alloted catch limits for these animals are often based on outdated evidence and do not take into account declining populations--as a result, many species are being slaughtered at unsustainable rates. Even though their meat is riddled with mercury and other toxins, there is still a strong economic incentive to hunt these animals. For example, a sea park will spend up to $98,000 for a live dolphin. 



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INDIA: DOLPHINS DECLARED NON-HUMAN PERSONS



October 14, 2013

Cetaceans should be regarded as non-human persons with their own rights and therefore it is morally unacceptable to keep them in captivity – this is the new ruling by the Government of India, which in a landmark decision has taken an important first step in establishing global animal welfare rights.



The decision was taken by India’s Minister of the Environment and Forests, who banned dolphin shows. All Indian states have been warned by the Government to reject proposals to hold dolphin shows or open dolphinariums, be these requests public or private.



The Central Animal Authority issued the following statement: “Cetaceans…should be seen as ‘non-human persons’ and as such should have their own specific rights.” The direct result is that dolphin parks which have opened recently in India will close and proposals for new ones will be shelved. The move makes it illegal to capture or confine cetacean species, which include whales and dolphins, the reasoning being that these animals are highly intelligent and sensitive.



India thus takes an important first step in establishing a universal code of animal ethics and rights. The heroine in this ruling is Puja Mitra, a leading Indian animal rights activist, whose research drive focused on, and introduced, the concept of non-human persons. Other countries to have banned the use of cetaceans for entertainment are Costa Rica, Hungary and Chile.



The work of marine scientist Lori Marino has revealed that cetaceans have large brains and complex behavior and advanced, intricate systems of communication and cognition.



For those who go to a dolphin show, just remember this question: Do you know how dolphins are captured? Most often, they are driven to waters where they cannot swim, the unmarked ones are hauled on to vessels to be carted off to dolphinariums to perform in freak shows and the others are wither hacked to pieces, or left to die.



From Towards the New Earth of Compassionate Living




Photo credit: Baby at play by Cj Kale on Fivehundredpx



NEWS FLASH AND CALL TO ACTION: 
NEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT IS TAKING FIRST STEPS TO OPEN UP MAUI'S & HECTOR'S HABITAT TO SHELL AND OFFSHORE OIL!



PLEASE SIGN THE ONLINE SUBMISSION:


"A corrosive drilling fluid that triggered the North Sea's worst gas leak in 20 years could threaten similar deep-sea wells across the world, and operator Total has already warned Shell that its nearby Shearwater field may be at risk."

"With Shell we have shared even more as they have a neighbouring field, Shearwater, meaning they potentially have, perhaps, not identical, but similar problems,"

"Like Elgin, Shell's Shearwater field is fed by a HPHT reservoir where temperatures can reach 140 degrees Celsius."

Shell declined to comment.

Is this risk worth the revenue the government claims will bring to New Zealand?
We say "NO!"
We can't let this happen to NZ waters & wildlife!!
The New Zealand government has proposed a law change to the Marine Legislation Bill, currently before Parliament. If passed, the public's RIGHT to OPPOSE deep-sea oil and gas exploration will be REMOVED!


University of Otago scientists, including lead Hector's & Maui's Dolphin researcher, Dr. Liz Slooten, attest to what's at stake if offshore oil is allowed into the currently proposed area of the Otago Coast.

Do you find this shocking & brazen of the NZ government?

The current NZ government has been opening the floodgates to oil companies whilst creating obstacles for defenders to demonstrate opposition to crimes against the environment!

READ MORE & pass this along too:

"Every Kiwi (New Zealander) should see this, John Wathen's eyewitness account of the Gulf of Mexico"
Devastating Offshore Oil Threat to NZ waters and ALL marine life, including the Maui's & Hector's Dolphins!!!

For further information on the Marine Legislation Bill:

To send in your own submission via e-mail:

Hon. Dr. Nick Smith, Minister of Conservation
Hon. Nathan Guy, Minister of Primary Industries
Hon. John Key, Prime Minister
Additional reference links:

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation and BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster in the Gulf of Mexico

"Anadarko Petroleum Corp., a partner in the BP Plc well that blew up in 2010 and triggered the largest U.S. offshore oil spill, must face a lawsuit claiming it misled investors, a judge said."

"...sufficient reason to sue over a statement by an Anadarko senior vice president, Robert Daniels, after the spill that the company had no involvement in design or procedures at BP’s Macondo well."

BP's Gulf Disaster (in April 2010) Goes to Court; Anadarko, Transocean Also Could Pay Billions in Damages

February 24 2012


Originally, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation owned 25% stake but in October 2011 this was transferred to BP as a part of a wider settlement between the companies.








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This porpoise slaughter is seven times bigger than The Cove's. So why haven't you heard about it?




Iwate, Japan, is once again poised to commence the world’s largest cetacean slaughter, 
which dwarfs the much more famous one in Taiji.





By David Kirby
September 19, 2013 

Every year for the past decade, volunteers from around the world have made a pilgrimage of protest to Japan, home to the eight-month bloodbath of whale and dolphin slaughter in the cove at Taiji. That hunt began again this month, and all eyes are on the infamous inlet—now more than ever—thanks to the Oscar-winning documentary The Cove.


But even as activists, scientists and movie stars rail against the brutal massacre of highly social and sentient animals, few campaigners know that some 500 miles to the north, in Iwate Prefecture, an annual slaughter of a beautiful species called Dall’s porpoise has been taking place in numbers that dwarf anything found at the cove.


Operating somewhat under the radar of public opprobrium, Iwate has traditionally staged the largest cetacean hunt on the planet. That is, until the 2011 earthquake and tsunami eviscerated Iwate’s coastal towns and destroyed much of the porpoise-hunting fleet.


For a while, it looked as though the hunt was gone forever, perhaps the only silver lining in a dark cloud of devastation. But now TakePart can exclusively report that operations somehow managed to resume last season, though on a much smaller scale, with a few hundred porpoises taken.


This season, however, from November 2012 to April 2013, the boats were back in greater numbers, killing about 1,200 porpoises, according to Clare Perry of the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), which is based in London.


Nobody knows if the Iwate numbers will rebound to pre-quake levels and once again outstrip Taiji’s death rate, but it’s possible. Before the cataclysm, in 2009-2010 for example, fishermen unseen off the coast hand-harpooned 9,129 Dall’s porpoises, seven times more than the 1,242 dolphins, pilot whales and false killer whales (all members of the dolphin family) driven into Taiji’s cove and butchered that same season.


In years past, when porpoise meat was used as a substitute for the more expensive whale meat, Iwate’s numbers neared the annual quota of 16,000 porpoises. In 1988, two years after the International Whaling Commission (IWC) stopped the killing of large whales, more than 40,000 Dall’s were dispatched.


With adult males reaching nearly 500 pounds, Dall’s are the largest of the six species of porpoises, which are not to be confused with dolphins, though they often are. The porpoise family is closer to belugas, evolutionarily speaking, than, say, bottlenose dolphins. Dall’s porpoises, named after an American naturalist, have gray-to-black bodies with gleaming white stomachs and flanks that flash in the water as they frantically dart about. They look like young, hyperactive killer whales, which many people mistake them for.



In addition to their lopsided death counts, another notable difference between Taiji and Iwate is that, in the latter, no animals are taken alive and sold for tremendous profit to aquariums and theme parks. Porpoises are not as trainable, sleek and acrobatic as dolphins, and relatively few have been put on display over the years.


It’s unlikely that Dall’s porpoises would survive in captivity anyway, says Dr. Naomi Rose of the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI). “Dall’s are open-water, fast swimmers who are fairly social for porpoises,” she says. “Their physical needs simply cannot be accommodated in captivity.” That may be one reason why this hunt has continued so quietly, for so long. There is no visible drama of parents being killed and calves being ripped from their mother’s side, destined for a tank somewhere.


The hunts are old. “Japan has a long history of coastal hunts of medium-sized cetaceans, (or) Small Type Coastal Whaling, or STCW,” says AWI consultant Sue Fisher. Japan’s “infamous large-scale pelagic [open ocean] hunts of great whales,” she adds, “only really began after World War II, at the suggestion of the USA, to provide protein on a large scale.”


All that great-whale meat drove many coastal hunts out of business. But some endured, not only in Taiji and Iwate, but also Hokkaido, Miyagi, Okinawa, and Chiba, where an additional 537 cetaceans were slain in 2009-2010. In Iwate and elsewhere, men on high-powered vessels head into the open sea, using tethered, hand-held harpoons to kill Dall’s, who unluckily like to skirt about the bow-wake of boats.


SO WHERE'S THE OUTRAGE?


To be fair, there has been some, mostly in the United Kingdom, though nothing in Japan and little in the United States.


The Dall’s hunt “is not as visible as Taiji, taking place far out at sea with small boats usually operated by two men. No one witnesses them being killed,” says EIA’s Perry. “The porpoises are landed early in the morning after being kept on ice and the whole process doesn’t have the graphic element of the Taiji hunts. But there has been international attention on the hunts, through the IWC and its Scientific Committee.”


Mark Palmer, of Earth Island Institute’s Dolphin Project, explains that, “focusing on one place, Taiji, with the drive hunt, makes sense. Especially if we can make the case that Japanese should not be eating dolphin meat because of mercury contamination and other pollutants, the Iwate and other hunts should also be banned.” The Iwate hunts “are much more difficult to monitor,” he adds, “they are offshore… and scattered among several different harbors.”


That’s not to say that on-the-ground groups like Save Japan Dolphins, founded by The Cove star Ric O’Barry, or Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, founded by Paul Watson, have ignored the Dall’s of Iwate.


In March 2011, “We sent one of our Cove Monitors, Brian Barnes, up to document the hunt,” O’Barry says. Barnes made the trip with Sea Shepherd’s Scott West and volunteer Tarah Millen, who also wanted to observe the operation. It was one of the few times the two groups had worked together in Japan. Sea Shepherd tends to adopt more aggressive tactics, while O’Barry’s group tends to prefer persuasion and dialogue.


They headed for the port of Otsuchi, a major porpoise processing center in Iwate, where Sea Shepherd volunteers, Marley Daviduk, Carisa Webster and someone by the name of Mike XVX would join them.


Barnes, Millen and West arrived in Otsuchi on March 10 and “quickly located the 13 boats and the butcher house,” West says. “The three of us made ourselves known by openly photographing the boats and facilities, which brought the expected police attention.”


The following day, after the three other Sea Shepherd volunteers arrived, they conducted more surveillance. “There were no porpoises killed and brought into Otsuchi on March 10 or 11,” West says. But they did see porpoise carcasses, which had been “brought to the large fishermen’s union shed where they were butchered,” behind stacks of plastic crates and out of view.  “The meat then would be distributed to various merchants.”


Then the earth rattled, hard.


“To the hill!” Barnes shouted as they drove through panicked streets amid blaring tsunami sirens. Barnes, who has an emergency-management background, says a small quake the day before prompted him to identify a nearby hill “as the safest vertical shelter for such an event.” Once there, “we watched the entire coastline get completely destroyed,” he says. “We were 170 feet above sea level. I could’ve laid flat on the road and extended my arm over the side of the hill and got my hand wet. We literally just barely survived.”


The same can be said for Iwate’s porpoise hunt.


So what now? Even as the hunting fleet regroups, demand for cetacean meat continues to drop. And Otsuchi is just 120 miles north of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, which is “not far from an ocean point of view,” Perry says. “The Japanese government has undertaken some cetacean tests, but to my knowledge not on Dall’s porpoise,” she adds. “I suspect they are not being tested, given the fact that the hunt operates in such a low-profile way. There have been many reports of caesium tests in minke whales, but none for Dall’s.”


Meanwhile, international efforts by the IWC, EIA, AWI and Whale and Dolphin Conservation, among others, will continue to apply pressure against the Dall’s hunt within the international community. Save Japan Dolphins and Sea Shepherd expect to do the same.


“All along, we have planned, when Taiji shuts down permanently, we would turn attention to the northern hunts,” Barnes says.


Sea Shepherd’s West predicts that Taiji could prove to be a tipping point. “It’s synonymous with the brutal greed that exists in the Japanese government,” he says. “If Japan were to end the Taiji slaughter, there’s a good chance that other such slaughters in Japan would end.”




http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/09/19/porpoise-iwate-japan-hunt-bigger-than-cove-taiji-japan


Photo credit: Susan E. Adams/ Flickr




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YOU CAN SPEAK FOR MAUI DOLPHINS: 
TWO WAYS TO HELP HERE. THANK YOU!
DEADLINE OCTOBER 10. 2013


Sign the petition:

Send an email to Department of Conservation New Zealand:






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The Ocean Project


Dolphin & Whale Petitions 
to Sign & Share




Compiled by The Ocean Project admin team

https://www.facebook.com/theocepro
This is the latest revised version of the Dolphin and whale petition list created on 01/04/2013. All petitions that have been closed since the previous list was posted ( March 2013) are removed as whale and new petitions have been added. Any one of you who has signed the petitions on the previous list only has to check from 168 upwards as these have been added after that list was posted.


Some petitions are close to the target and/or will be closed before a new list will be created, please keep in mind that we try to keep it up to date in the notes section of our page .Vacant numbers will not be used to avoid confusion, new petitions will be added at the bottom of the list. Last but not least, please share this list far and wide, thank you for your support .



UPDATED AUGUST 26-2013




Whales and Dolphins: Will Humanity Put a Stop to this Madness?

by Carol Grieve
February 27, 2013











SUPPORT RIC O'BARRY AND THE DOLPHIN PROJECT ~ SHUTDOWN TAIJI DOLPHIN SLAUGHTERS





LIVE STREAM VIDEO FROM THE DOLPHIN PROJECT AT TAIJI, JAPAN











TO FREE A DOLPHIN: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO GRASSROOTS DOLPHIN ACTIVISM





by Richard O'Barry

When you first see a dolphin show, it looks like a lot of fun. The dolphins are always smiling, and they're also laughing in their own way - and so are we. The audience is applauding as these marvelous creatures - so intelligent, so bursting with energy - doing amazing tricks for us.


COULD ANYTHING BE BETTER :


Well, yes. It could be better if it were true. The dolphin smiling and all of us laughing and having a rollicking good time, all this seems like it's really happening. But look again. It's actually show business. At first glance you think it's real and I don't blame you, because it's magic, theater magic.


For many years I worked the show-biz side of things. I helped capture dolphins for the Miami Seaquarium and trained them, putting on a great show of dolphins leaping and jumping through hoops on command and acting the clown in amusing skits. I even trained the most famous of all dolphins, Flipper, who starred in his own TV series and feature films during the 1960s, some of which are still being seen around the world. It was a great job and a daily challenge, staying ahead of the scriptwriters and the several dolphins that played the role of Flipper.


DISILLUSIONMENT :


Only toward the end of my dolphin-training career did I admit to myself that there's something wrong about using dolphins for our amusement. They have wonderfully rich lives of their own until we yank them out of the sea, their lives as a species going back 60 million years. I worked for a time on the Miami Seaquarium Capture Boat and used to help abduct them, kicking and screaming all the way. We brought them ashore and dumped them into an alien fantasy world -- and why? It was my job. If someone would pay me to do this, surely, I thought, it must be okay. I really thought what I was doing was acceptable. I even convinced myself that the dolphins we captured were lucky because they would be cared for by humans for the rest of their lives. And listen to the people laugh and clap their hands when the dolphins do flips in the air. Isn't that worth something?


I could have stayed in the business of capturing and training dolphins and could have made a lot of money doing it. But when the Flipper show ended and I suddenly had lots of time to think about my life so far, I was sick to my stomach. I was appalled and disgusted by what I had been part of. I was also determined to stop it.


Oh, it would be difficult, I knew. Perhaps impossible. If it had taken me years to see dolphins as they actually are and what we were doing to them, how could I expect the public to understand? I was being paid to think that it was okay, of course. On the other hand, I knew what dolphins in the wild were really like. Most people who go to dolphin shows believe that it's great family entertainment. How could I get anyone to realize that this is just a lie, an elaborate ruse masking our ruthless exploitation of these magnificent creatures?


Like any other business, the dolphin captivity industry is based on supply and demand. As long as there are people willing to buy tickets to watch dolphins perform tricks, dolphins will be captured from the wild and trained to perform for huge paying audiences. Therefore, the key to putting a stop to the exploitation of dolphins is to reach the consumers. I am sure that if the public knew what really goes on behind the glittering scene of the captive dolphin spectacle, most would revolt against it. In other words, rather than buying tickets to watch dolphins perform, they would be helping us free them.


Getting worldwide public opinion on our side, getting people to see what we see at a dolphin show, that's our big goal. And we're making some progress overall, winning in some parts of the world; losing in others. If people understand our message, they'll join us. I'm sure of that. If they can realize that when we talk about “dolphin abuse,” we don't necessarily mean that they're being kicked or neglected. Being in captivity itself is abusive. For a wild dolphin swimming free, being captured and plunged into a tank that's like a teacup, how could that not be abusive?


THE OTHER SIDE, AND WHY THEY HATE US :


Owners of dolphin shows and the people who work there have a huge advantage. For openers, many people like the shows. They're amused by the silly dolphin antics. Or they love the spectacles of animal domination, and the more amazing the animal, the more they love it. Chances are they'll never understand what we are trying to do. But a lot of others are borderline. They will listen to us and to their own heart.


The other side has lots of money, billions of dollars. As part of the establishment, they make money and pay taxes. They're good citizens. They advertise, they support the chamber of commerce, and as far as the government is concerned, dolphin shows are just another taxable business.

But it's an ugly business, and that's our key to winning.


Since many people are amused by dolphins doing tricks, the key to our campaign is to show them that it's not amusing, that in fact it's disgusting. If we could convince even a third of the people who go to these shows that it's actually exploitation of the most unforgivable kind, the shows would end tomorrow.

Why do they hate us? They hate us because if we succeed, they go down in flames.

GETTING TO KNOW DOLPHINS :






One of the first steps in getting others to see the problem is to know dolphins in the wild. The most obvious and important difference is that wild dolphins don't wear funny hats, for instance. Nor do they jump through hoops, dance on their tails, applaud themselves with their pectoral fins, or make squeaky sounds like Flipper the TV star.


In your study of dolphins you'll find that the majority of dolphins held in captivity are Atlantic Bottlenose dolphins. (Tursiops truncatus) They live in temperate and tropical waters worldwide, weigh from 300 to 600 pounds and grow to more than eight feet in length. They live in groups called “pods,” made up of from several individuals to several hundred - males usually hanging out with males, females with females and their calves - and they swim up to 40 miles a day, navigating, socializing, mating, and foraging for schools of fish.


Whales (Cetacea) are divided into 13 families, which are composed of about 76 species. Four of those 13 families are baleen whales (Mysticeti), those that swim through the ocean sifting out plankton (like small crustaceans and krill) to eat. All the other families are Odontoceti, which means that they have teeth. They use these teeth not for chewing, incidentally, but for grasping. One of those families, the Delphinidae, is composed of 31 species, including the killer whale (Orca), common dolphin, porpoise, spinner dolphin and the bottlenose dolphin, (Tursiops truncatus), the one like Flipper.


But when we see them at a dolphin show, what do we see? I'll tell you what I see. I see a dolphin eager to please and ready to do whatever the trainer wants him to. And why? Because he's hungry. Yes, dolphins perform tricks because that's when they're fed. One of the first things a trainer learns about dolphins is that they do not perform immediately unless they're hungry. This is why dolphins are fed during the show. You see the trainer blow a whistle and toss them a fish every time they do something right. And they know what they're supposed to do because they've been trained to expect a fish when they get it right. In fact they often start the show themselves when they get hungry. The trainers call their training method “positive reward.” From the dolphins’ perspective, however, it's food deprivation. If the dolphins get it wrong and the whistle is not blown, that means they won't be getting any fish reward.


If you understand the life of captive dolphins, you also begin to see the dolphin show with all its clowning around in another way. It's not clever anymore. It's abusive. When we understand that the dolphins are doing this because it's their only way of staying alive, we see it clearly for what it is: dominance. We're making dolphins do silly things, they would never do in nature, because we're amused by dominating helpless members of another species. The worst part is that it teaches children that it's okay to mock and disrespect one of nature's most fabulous of beings. The law permits this only because it's supposed to be educational. What a joke! But the joke is on us. These pathetic dolphins in captivity, wearing funny hats and leaping through hoops, are in no way like dolphins are in the wild.


The saddest part is that we've allowed the entertainment industry not only to twist a beautiful species into a parody of itself but also allowed them to profit from it.

What happens to dolphins when the show is over and everybody is gone? Most of the dolphins do nothing at all. They languish in their tank or cage and wait for the next show, the next feeding.


If you feel the same way about dolphins that I do, then this booklet is for you. Either you want to stop a planned dolphinarium or try to shut down an existing one. Or you want to stop the capture and trade (import and export) in dolphins. Or maybe you simply want to help us spread the word about the plight of captive dolphins.


Getting organized :


Animal protection organizations are practically everywhere, but not all of them work on the dolphin captivity issue. Unfortunately, some groups simply post information about the dolphin captivity issue on their websites for fund-raising purposes. Do your homework and ask them exactly what they are doing on this issue. Log onto your computer and surf the web, call newspapers, check at city hall and the chamber of commerce for organizations that are already working on the kind of campaign you wish to conduct. If you find one, join them. If none of the organizations you contact work on the dolphin captivity issue, maybe you can get them interested in starting such a campaign.


In working for dolphins or any other cause, you'll discover that you need to communicate with some government agencies, as well as people in the media, law enforcement officials and civic organizations. You'll need to write to these people from time to time, they'll get to know your name, you'll make appointments to talk to them at their office and later, perhaps, you'll get to know them well enough so that you can just drop by if you have a special problem or a question. You may get lucky; some of these people may be closet animal protection supporters.


If you have a special problem, something that needs immediate attention, consider calling in the media. Their job is reporting special problems.

And don't forget civic clubs. If you like to speak publicly, every civic club in the world is looking for someone interesting to talk to them. If you do a good job at your first one, they'll all want you. This is an excellent way to recruit more members to your cause.


Dealing with the law:


The legislation concerning dolphin captivity is different in every country. You will need to research what the law says in the specific country you are dealing with. If you find it's too complicated to do, contact an animal welfare organization in that country. They will be more than happy to help you find the information you are looking for. In fact, they probably already have the specific legislation on file and can send it to you in a matter of a few days.


In some cases the legislation regarding the keeping of cetaceans will support you in your efforts to stop a planned dolphinarium. But be prepared that in most cases it won't.


The media:


Unless you can get your story out to the public, you will get nowhere in your campaign. You need the media for that. But don't call it “publicity.” A reporter or journalist of any media is not interested in your publicity. Reporters are interested in news or a good story. The reporter comes to you because he or she needs facts for the story. So you must deal in facts. Don't guess. Don't offer your opinion, your suspicion, or your hope as fact. And if you don't know the answer to a question, just say so. But if you know anything at all that the reporter needs to know, say that. Be helpful, and honest.


Don't even think about manipulating the press. You don't want to be manipulated, do you? Well, neither do reporters. And they know immediately when you try to manipulate them. Instead, think in terms of getting the information out to the public. That's what the reporter is thinking. Don't fool yourself about what the reporter should be doing. He/she is never looking for the truth. Two and two are four is true, but reporters never write about it. The reporter is looking for a good story. But only if it's true. If you help him/her, the reporter will appreciate it by calling on you in the future.


Play it straight. And don't be surprised if the media is not on your side or even fair. They usually listen to all sides of a controversy and sometimes they might favor the other side. Remember that most aquariums and amusement parks spend a fortune advertising in the local media, and newspapers and TV stations don't want to alienate their client.


Providing background:


When you supply information to a reporter, have the background and supporting data of your story available. If you're talking about the law regarding dolphins, for instance, acknowledge that the law doesn't reflect our views about abuse and we're working to change it. From our viewpoint, captivity is abusive in itself. But in a climate of abuse, captivity as a form of abuse seems to be invisible to many people. Our campaign is to get them to see what we see. We want them to realize that putting dolphins in captivity is an abuse of power. Dolphins didn't volunteer to be clowns in our world. They were captured in a froth of violence and plunked into a business to amuse people, a world where they must play the fool just to stay alive. Some of these dolphins were born into this dead end job.


Until the law is changed, all we can legally do is inveigh against captivity and take note of more obvious kinds of abuse. If you were to witness a trainer kicking a dolphin, that's clearly abusive. Don't expect to see abuse like that, though. A trainer kicking a dolphin would be fired. And most trainers wouldn't dream of kicking their dolphins.


It's all about money:


Back in 1938 when dolphin exploitation suddenly burst on the scene at Marine Studios in St. Augustine, Florida, USA, the public paid a few dollars each and sat in the stands to watch dolphins do their tricks. Now they've found something much more profitable to do with dolphins. Now you can “swim” with them. It's not really swimming, of course. Customers take turns holding on to the dolphins' dorsal fins and having the dolphin pull them around the tank.


My wife Helene and I monitored a swim program in the Caribbean during March of 2001. Customers entered the tank six at a time to encounter two waiting dolphins, three others on standby. The swim periods lasted less than 15 minutes each. Except for brief breaks so that the dolphins could perform in the show, the swim program we monitored was going full blast, loud techno music blaring, from 9 a.m. till after 8 p.m.


Is this abusive?



Horrendously so!


It's also quite profitable, which explains why swim programs are springing up like mushrooms.


Doing the math, we have dolphins servicing six people every 15 minutes. That's 24 people an hour. If this goes on for 11 hours, the dolphins work 264 pay periods in a single day. And at $65 per pay period, that's $17,160.


But that's not all. Three photos are taken of each person swimming with the dolphins. These cost $7 each. Assuming that each of the 264 swimmers buys one picture, that's $1,848, bringing the grand total to $19,008 a day.


Even this was not enough for proprietors of the show. The next year they raised the price from $65 to $75.


Now we all want to make a profit. But please! Not like this.


Handling delicate questions:


There are a number of questions you will be asked when announcing your opposition to dolphin captivity. In many cases a journalist who has first interviewed the “other side” will ask you questions like these:




Q: What about “special cases” like Make-a-Wish Kids? These are children dying of a disease like cancer, and their final wish is to swim with a dolphin. Don't they benefit by swimming with dolphins?


A: They would benefit just as much by getting a puppy from the pound. There is no scientific evidence to support the claim that Dolphin-Assisted-Therapy works. Even if there were, it couldn't possibly justify the animal cruelty that these programs are based upon.


Q: Kids from the inner city would never otherwise see a dolphin, would they?


A: The very same kids will never see a snow leopard.



Q: If dolphins weren't on display, how would people learn to care about them or protect them?


A: Nonsense! Humpback whales are protected by people who have never seen them in captivity.




Q: What's wrong with keeping a few dolphins in captivity? There are millions of them out there.


A: It's abusive, that's what's wrong. There are millions of women and children out there, too, but that doesn't mean it's okay to abuse a few of them.


Collecting facts:


Since our value as an organization is based on the facts we gather, let's consider how facts are gathered. Read books about dolphins and take notes. When you read newspapers and magazines, clip out items that relate to dolphins. This will help you learn about them. Develop a file system and date entries in your files. In collecting facts, collect complete facts, which includes exactly who did what to whom and when. Everything you learn about the subject can be put in the files and dated. From time to time, you might want to make sub-files and a key to them that will allow you to go directly to a particular item.




In your reading, you will run across the names of people who are quoted about dolphins. Collect their names and what they said in the stories. Later you can call them for verification and further information.


Gathering facts in the field about captive dolphins is sometimes quite challenging because you can't be sure that the names dolphins have are correct. Little honky-tank dolphin road shows and even the largest, most prestigious of dolphinariums have been known to substitute one dolphin for another whenever it suited them. Get to know the dolphins individually. Check out their dorsal fins, for instance. Dorsal fins in ideal dolphins are always perfect. But the dorsal fins of real dolphins are often flawed. Note the dolphin's general size, his eyes and skin condition. Many have nicks and scars.


Don't be confused by rake marks. When dolphins play or fight with one another, their teeth leave temporary superficial scrape marks on the side of their fellow dolphins' skin, the marks as if you had run your fingernails down their side. This is not necessarily abuse; it happens with dolphins in a tank, and in the wild. But for other signs you can get photos for verification if you need them. Take a video camera with you to record what you're talking about.


Avoiding pitfalls:


Over the years we have worked with numerous campaigners, of which some belong to the category of people who, without knowing a whole lot about dolphins, have a strong sense that dolphins don't belong in captivity. In order to help them be more effective in their attempt at educating the public about dolphin captivity, we have had to first educate the campaigners. Knowing what kinds of mistakes first-time campaigners most frequently make, the following is meant as a help to avoid some of these common pitfalls.


1. Knowing the dolphin species:


When putting together a dolphin fact sheet for your supporters, the general public and the media, it's important that the information you provide is factual. As mentioned earlier, there are about 76 species of dolphins and they are all different. Educate yourself on the specific characteristics of the particular dolphin species you are referring to. Is your campaign aimed at closing down a facility that keeps bottlenose dolphins? Or is your campaign directed at preventing the import of a Pacific white-sided dolphin or a beluga whale? Make sure that your fact sheet provides information on the specific species of dolphin you're dealing with.


Just one example:


“Dolphins in the wild swim up to 100 miles a day.”


This statement doesn't tell the reader which dolphin species we're talking about. I happen to know that the statement comes from a leaflet that aims at providing information on the bottlenose dolphin. But bottlenose dolphins don't swim up to 100 miles per day. This information applies to another dolphin species, the orca, also known as the killer whale.


A mistake like this is very unfortunate because it undermines your credibility. You don't' have to be a marine biologist to talk intelligently about dolphins, but you do need to know the difference between the basic characteristics of a bottlenose dolphin and a killer whale.


2. Knowing the dolphin issues:


Another common pitfall is for a campaigner to be mislead by the dolphin captivity industry's deliberate attempt at confusing the dolphin issues. An example of this is how dolphinariums use the tuna-dolphin issue to justify the display of dolphins. They say that fisherman would still be killing dolphins in their tuna nets if people could not see dolphins up-close and personal. "You only love what you know," is their argument. But the dolphin species that get caught in tuna nets are the spinner dolphin and the spotted dolphins; not the bottlenose dolphins that are on display. Furthermore, you need to be aware of the following: Seven to ten million dolphin have been killed by the tuna industry in recent years. Environmentalists launched a boycott of canned tuna that lasted for several years. During this time, marine parks did nothing to educate the public to the tuna-dolphin issue. In fact, you could buy a tuna-fish sandwich at most dolphinariums! I suspect they did not want to disrupt the complacency of their paying guests who were there for casual amusement. It's ironic, therefore, that the captive dolphin industry is now trying to take credit for solving the tuna-dolphin problem.



3. Using US regulation as a role model:


Over the years, I have been contacted by many people who wanted to prevent a proposed dolphinarium from being established in their country. One of the first things they have asked me is, “Can't we stop it by arguing that this new facility won't live up to US standards and is therefore substandard?”


The answer is no. In the United States the government agency that sets the standards for the keeping of cetaceans in captivity, such as the required amount of space, is the US Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS). According to these rules it is legal to confine a dolphin in an enclosure that measures no more than 30 by 30 feet, 6 feet deep. What kind of standard is this? Any captive dolphin facility can easily exceed it. The standards for keeping dolphins in captivity in the United States were made up by marine mammal scientists and veterinarians who were working for the dolphin captivity industry. These dolphin tanks and cages were not designed in the best interest of the animals. They were designed in the best interest of those who stood to make a profit from displaying captive dolphins. Don't expect the government agencies of the United States to do the right thing when it comes to captive dolphins. The bottom line is: The system doesn't work.


4. The “If we're going to do it, let's do it right” - pitfall:


“What is the required amount of space a captive dolphin needs in order to be happy?” is another question we are often asked by first-time campaigners. They want to use this information to argue with the authorities that the size of the facility they are fighting is too small and therefore must be shut down or at least made bigger. But any tank or enclosure is too small for a dolphin. Dolphins are free-ranging marine mammals that would normally swim up to 40 miles per day. Our work is not about making the cage bigger. It's about abolishing the cage. So the answer to the question is simple: The only habitat that meets a dolphin's space requirements is - the open sea.


5. The statistics:


There has been much debate about the longevity of captive dolphins compared with that of dolphins in the wild. Some animal welfare organizations publicize mortality statistics as if they were based on indisputable facts. For example, they will tell you that the average lifespan of captive bottlenose dolphins is about five years compared with 45 years in nature. This statement is highly misleading, first of all because it confuses average lifespan with maximum longevity: According to some researchers, 45 years is the maximum longevity of bottlenose dolphins in the wild, not the average lifespan (life expectancy). Secondly, nobody really knows the exact average lifespan of captive dolphins. In order to know this information one would need to have access to the records for every single dolphin that has been brought into captivity worldwide since 1938, either by the means of a capture or through captive breeding. One would have to know the exact time of capture or birth and the exact time of death. It is simply not possible to gather this information, as it is not made available to us by the dolphin captivity industry. What's more, even if were factual that dolphins last only about five years in captivity, this doesn't tell us anything about how old the dolphins were at their time of death. As you can see, it makes no sense to compare average lifespan and maximum life expectancy as seen in the statement above.

However, the biggest mistake in putting so much emphasis on captive dolphins' average lifespan compared with that of dolphins in nature is the fact that it reduces this issue to being a question of how long a captive dolphin can be kept alive. It's like saying that if the dolphin captivity industry were able to keep their dolphins alive for a certain amount of time, then there wouldn't be a problem with capturing and confining these animals. But an animal's life span cannot be used as a measurement for the animal's well being. The dolphin captivity issue is not about quantity of life; it's about quality of life, not about science, but ethics.


6. Captive born dolphins versus captured dolphins:


"If the dolphinariums only used dolphins that were born in captivity, then there wouldn't be a problem," is another typical pitfall. We are aware that some captive dolphin facilities are trying to appear politically correct by displaying captive born dolphins. But we strongly oppose captive breeding. It is imperative to consider the ethics and educational value of breeding dolphins in captivity. Some dolphins have been confined within the same barren walls of a concrete tank all their lives. They think the roof is the sky and have never experienced the simplest elements of nature, such as the natural rhythms of the sea, the sunshine, and the rain. They will never swim in a straight line for as long as they desire; nor will they ever be able to use their speed, intelligence, sonar, and sense of cooperation to catch live fish. They are freaks that we have created for our own amusement, and they have no positive educational value.


7. Dolphin - Assisted - Therapy:


Don't accept the use of dolphins in so-called Dolphin-Assisted-Therapy (DAT.) DAT has become a lucrative business over the last years and presents a serious threat to the welfare of dolphins, in that it creates further violent captures of dolphins worldwide.


DAT takes advantage of desperate and vulnerable parents who pay large sums of money to give their ill or disabled children what the billion-dollar dolphin captivity industry advertises as a life-enhancing dolphin experience. But there is no scientific evidence to substantiate the claim that spending time in a tank or sea enclosure with dolphins has a healing effect on people. Even if there was, could this really justify the high price that dolphins pay for our desire to be close to them? We find that it is inherently hypocritical to capture and confine dolphins - thereby destroying the quality of their lives - in an attempt to enhance our own.

When considering whether or not using dolphins to heal people is acceptable, it is important to note the following:


Dolphins are free ranging, social, sonic, and highly intelligent marine mammals. The vastness and biological diversity of the open sea cannot be duplicated in a tank or an enclosure in the sea. Consequently, the complexity of a dolphin's behavioral repertoire cannot be accommodated in captivity. Based on today’s knowledge of Cetaceans’ sophisticated physiology and highly developed emotional sense, one must conclude that confining dolphins and other whales to a small space inevitably causes stress in the animals. This negative effect of captivity is reinforced by the fact that dolphins used in Swim-With-The-Dolphins programs and DAT programs have to be trained by the means of food control to endure the constant pressure of being used as pets and "healers."


It is hardly surprising that dolphins used in swim programs have demonstrated agitated and aggressive behaviors under the stressful conditions of confinement and forced interactions with people. These behaviors have resulted in injury to swimmers. A 300-400 pound frustrated animal can cause serious injury to a human being, and there are accounts of human injuries in the form of lacerations, tooth rakes, internal injuries, broken bones and shock.


Legal concerns:


The trick is to expose the people who need to be exposed as much as possible, without getting sued.


During interviews and in your printed material don't let your enthusiasm exceed the facts. Neither should you assume that quoted material you've found in the media is correct. It would be correct to say that John Doe was quoted saying “Such and such” in a certain edition of a periodical, but not that he actually said it. If you need to know whether he actually said it or not, you should verify it with him directly. And even then, it would not necessarily survive cross-examination in a court of law unless you can prove it with a witness who would back you up.

Watch out for libel. But don't be paralyzed by it. I'm not a lawyer, but I have a working theory about libelous statements in the United States: If you deal in facts and your motives are pure, don't worry about it.


Libel is too complicated to examine here except in a cursory way. You should know, however, that libel is not merely a false statement. Nobody is perfect. Libel is a statement that is published (meaning circulated to the public) and injures somebody's reputation. (Your reputation is what other people think of you.) What you write in a private letter is not libelous because it's not published. You also cannot libel the dead or anyone with a bad reputation. And it's very difficult to libel a public figure, the reason being that he put himself in the public eye and must take the risk of criticism.


As a practical matter, any statement that might injure anyone's reputation should be checked and rechecked. If the statement is true and you can prove it, go ahead and use it if you need to. Bottom line: Truth and a lack of malice is an absolute defense to charges of libel, provided you can prove it and there was a good reason to publish it in the first place.




One further thing: libel is not easy to prove. In order for the person libeled to collect in a court of law, he must show (prove) that the statement led directly to his financial loss.


Try to enlist the help of a pro-bono lawyer. If you have the money, hire one that is interested in these issues.


Using the data:


So when you've gathered the information, what do you do with it?


Sometimes we have so much material that strongly indicates mistreatment of dolphins, we can go directly to the police or prosecuting attorney. In either case you will be expected to cite the law or regulation you claim is being broken and who broke it, when and where.


If your information doesn't support criminal charges, it may be strong enough for the media. Send a press release to all newspapers and TV stations in the area. They all have reporters interested in legitimate environmental subjects. Generally they're leery of a story that could backfire into a lawsuit that would cost them money - even if they win it. So you can expect them to be skeptical at first. And if they suspect that your information is not completely accurate, they'll show you the door.


Use your spell-checker. People who can spell correctly are taken more seriously.

Writing letters to the editor should always include your full name, address, and telephone number. Newspapers will most likely call you, before publishing your letter, they need to confirm that it was you who wrote the letter.


More than facts:


We need facts, but the main thrust of our campaign is moral. We're saying that keeping dolphins in captivity is wrong.


Our objective is to shut down captive dolphin facilities and stop any further captures and exploitation of dolphins. Ultimately, what we want to do is free captive dolphins; return them to the wild if possible. Not all captive dolphins can be successfully released back into the wild, of course. Some dolphins have been in captivity too long and sometimes they've forgotten even how to catch a life fish or eat one. Can we tell whether a captive dolphin can make it in the wild or not?


Definitely.


We don't do it by training them to be free dolphins, incidentally. That's impossible. But we can give them a chance for rehabilitation by weaning them away from everything human beings have taught them and reacquainting them with the skills they depended on as dolphins in nature.


If they succeed, they're candidates for freedom. We release them, monitor them till we're sure they're okay in the wild, and then go on to the next case. For those who are not candidates, we can try to transfer them to protective custody. Our coalition would like to establish a dolphin sanctuary for these particular dolphins.


Twelve simple things you can do:


1. If you hear of a planned dolphin capture, alert the media or, if possible, videotape it yourself and then hand the footage over to the media. The last thing the dolphin captivity industry wants is for the public to see images of a violent dolphin capture. This is how we stopped the captures of dolphins in the United States where there is currently a voluntary moratorium on dolphin captures.


2. Contact your government officials and representatives. Ask them to implement greater protection for marine mammals and the sea in general. There is no point in saving the dolphin without saving its habitat.


3. Write to government officials and insist that existing captive dolphin facilities be instituted to work toward the rehabilitation and release of captive dolphins.


4. Boycott captive dolphin shows and encourage your friends to do the same. Buy or rent a video of dolphins in the wild with the money that you saved.


5. Speak out. A Letter to the Editor of your local newspaper will reach thousands of people.


6. Encourage others to become interested in the plight of captive dolphins and show them how they can help.


7. Write to government officials and ask them not to approve permits for the trade (import or export) of marine mammals.


8. Remember, the commercial exploitation of dolphins is based on supply and demand, just like any other product. If you don't buy a ticket, you won't be supporting this abuse. Tell your friends.


9. Produce a free public event. Bring in some dolphin experts who are opposed to dolphin captivity and give a free lecture to the community and invite the media. This is a great way to start a campaign. We would be happy to help you with this.


10. Challenge the local dolphinarium to a public debate. The debate could be held at a television station, a public library, hotel, civic center or just about anyplace in the community. We would be happy to help you with this also. We have participated in debates with the dolphin captivity industry all over the world.


11. Start a letter writing campaign to local government officials. There are several international organizations in the animal protection community that will be willing to write a letter of support for your anti-captivity campaign.


12. Distribute your message. Produce bumper stickers, one-page flyers that can be handed out to the public, posted at bulletin boards, laundromats, libraries, grocery stores, and other public places. We have even rented full size billboards that carried our anti-captivity message.


Protesting the abuse:


If the media turns its back on you, consider going public with a demonstration.


Because a protest involves a direct contact of emotional opposites, anything could happen during a demonstration. We try to script them to keep control of things. We tell police officials in advance what we're going to do so that nobody will get bopped on the head.


But nobody really knows what will happen during a protest, and that's one of the main reasons the media covers demonstrations. Though the media has turned us down in terms of a straight news or feature story, the main job of the media is still to report what people do. And that includes a staged event. It's worth covering because something truly newsworthy might happen. And if they don't cover the protest and their opposition does, they are caught off guard if something does happen. The main reason, though, is that in the back of their minds they know that real news usually begins from inside when disaffected whistle-blowers go public. And when the media refuse to listen to whistle-blowers, they do so at their peril.


Protesters are trying to alert the public to a legal or moral problem and a governmental cover up. They blow the whistle in protesting, and when the media covers it, the job is done.


Rules for protesting:


1. Demonstrations and protests must be legal and peaceful. You represent your cause, so be courteous.
2. If you need a permit in order to protest, get one. You can call City Hall or the police department and ask if you need one. Always get names of people you talk to on the phone. With the permit, you will be told where you are allowed to demonstrate. Explain this to everyone in the demonstration. You will probably not be allowed to interfere with people attending the event or trying to buy a ticket.
3. If you have a lawyer, let him/her know what you're doing.
4. Only one person should speak for the group.This avoids the appearance of conflict, which can destroy the effectiveness of the demonstration.
5. Hand out dodgers (printed only on one side) that briefly explain your position and give the group's address and phone number. If someone tosses the dodger on the ground, pick it up and give it to someone else. If they tear it up, gather up the pieces and put them in the trash. Be pleasant at all times.


Protesting really works:


"Eighty percent of success is showing up"

Woody Allen


Looking back, we were successful in closing several captive dolphin facilities in the United States, some in Australia, Canada, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and other places around the world.


There's an important point here that needs to be mentioned: Almost all of these facilities were closed because caring people showed up to protest and demonstrate their concern. If protesting was not part of the campaign, these facilities would still be open for business today, and the suffering would continue.

I mention this because some animal protection organizations and individuals don't want to participate in any kind of protest. Some won't participate because they are following the policy of the conservative organization that they work for. Others seem to think that protesting is undignified or below them. Personally, I don't like protesting either, it goes against my very nature. I don't like bringing attention to myself. But it's necessary and important, so I do it anyhow.


It's important to understand that protesting really works. Many times it's the only thing that works. For example, in the United States the dolphin captivity industry stopped capturing dolphins because of a small handful of protesters that were not afraid to disrupt the dolphin captures. Many of the captive dolphins in various European amusement parks - including a discothèque - were captured in the Gulf of Mexico near Pine Island, Florida. We started protesting these captures, even to the point of getting arrested, going to jail and then on a hunger strike to bring attention to the problem. This is called civil disobedience. It attracted the media who, for the first time, exposed that fact that the captivity industry in the United States was capturing Florida dolphins and selling them to deplorable facilities abroad. We called this campaign "Export Oranges, Not Dolphins." We printed tee shirts and bumper stickers with our slogan. Eventually, the captivity industry backed off and announced that they were observing a "voluntary moratorium" on all dolphin captures. The capture of dolphins in the United States was finally over.


Why did this happen? The answer is simple: the media finally exposed the dolphin captivity industry. And the media only showed up because they were attracted by the protesters. The daily news is like show business, and the media is always looking for a good story. This is especially true with TV news. They want moving pictures, action and conflict. To them, these are elements of a good story. And we give it to them in a non-violent, peaceful manner.
Most people who visit dolphinariums never ask the right questions. They ask things like "what's the dolphin's name," "how much do they eat," or something trivial like that. The questions that they should be asking are: "How did the dolphin get here, and how long is he going to be staying here?" Questions like these are not so easy to answer, and these questions are discouraged by the dolphinarium.


The dolphinarium will have you believe that God put the dolphins there, or they came out of the sky. They don't want the visitors to know that the dolphins they are watching were actually captured. When confronted with the fact that the dolphin was captured, they will often say that this was a "humane capture." But the concept of a humane capture is an oxymoron: There is simply no such thing as a humane dolphin capture. All dolphin captures are violent and cruel.

When this kind of violent and cruel injustice is absolute, one must oppose it absolutely. And that means showing up to protest, in a non-violent, peaceful manner. The bottom line is: Direct action works.


Lerner Marine Lab                               
Bimini, Bahamas Islands         
Closed

Marineland                                           
Adelaide, Australia                    
Closed

Waragamba Dam Dolphinarium       
Waragamba, Australia              
Closed

Antwerp Zoo Dolphinarium                
Antwerp, Belgium                       
Closed

Hagenbeck Zoo Dolphinarium         
Hamburg, Germany                   
Closed

Kinder Zoo Dolphinarium                   
Rapperswil, Switzerland           
Closed

Tel Aviv Dolphinarium                        
Tel Aviv, Israel                             
Closed

Luna Park Dolphinarium                    
Tel Aviv, Israel                             
Closed

Seaquarium                                          
San Andres, Colombia              
Closed

Ocean Reef Club Dolphinarium       
Key Largo, Florida                      
Closed

Oklahoma City Zoo Dolphinarium   
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma        
Closed

Ocean World                                         
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida              
Closed

US Navy Dolphin Facility                   
Key West, Florida                       
Closed

Santos Amusement Park                   
Santos, Brazil                              
Closed

Dolphin Swim Program                      
Buenos Aires Argentina            
Closed

Ocean Expo Dolphinarium                
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina  
Never Opened

Dolphin Swim Program                     
Managua, Nicaragua                 
Never Opened

Dolphin Swim Program                      
Guatemala City, Guatemala      
Closed

Europapark Rust                                  
Rust, Germany                            
Closed

Hansaland Dolphinarium                  
Hamburg, Germany                    
Closed

Holiday Park Dolphinarium               
Hossloch, Germany                    
Closed

Phantasialand Dolphinarium            
Bruhl, Germany                           
Closed

Paramount Parks (four parks)           
USA                                               
Closed

Wonderland                                          
Maple, Ontario, Canada            
Closed

Worlds of Fun Dolphinarium             
Kansas City, Missouri                
Closed

Knotts Berry Farm Dolphinarium      
Los Angeles, California             
Closed

Six Flags Dolphinarium                      
Aurora, Ohio                                
Closed

Marine Life Dolphinarium                  
Sioux Falls, South Dakota         
Closed

Colorado Ocean Journey                  
Denver, Colorado                       
Never Opened

Virginia Marine Science Center       
Virginia Beach, Virginia             
Never Opened

Proposed Dolphinarium                    
Maui, Hawaii                                
Never Opened

Sealand Dolphinarium                       
Victoria, BC                                  
Never Opened

Montreal Biodome                              
Quebec, Canada                         
No Belugas

Vancouver Aquarium                         
Vancouver, Canada                    
No Orca Show

Granby Zoo                                          
Quebec, Canada                         
Never Opened

Dolphin Swim Park                             
Les Arcadins Islands, Haiti        
Closed

Flamingo Land                                    
England                                         
Closed

Brighton Dolphinarium                      
England                                         
Closed

Morecambe Dolphinarium                
England                                         
Closed

Windsor Safari Park                           
England                                          
Closed

Moulin Rouge Nightclub                   
Paris, France                                 
Closed

Seaorama                                           
Galveston, Texas                          
Closed

Ocean World                                        
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida               
Closed

Cedar Fair                                           
Sandusky, Ohio                            
Closed

Kings Island                                         
Kings Island, Ohio                        
Closed

Six Flags over Texas                         
Arlington, Texas                           
Closed

Six Flags Mid-America                      
Eureka, Missouri                           
Closed

Astro-World of Houston                     
Houston, Texas                              
Closed

Six Flags Magic Mountain                
Los Angeles, California               
Closed

Paradise                                             
Acapulco, Mexico                          
Closed

Centro Vacacional Oaxtepec           
Mexico                                            
Never Opened

Edmonton Shopping Mall
Edmonton, Canada                     
Closed

Louisville Marine Display                 
Louisville, Kentucky                     
Never Opened

Dolphin Discovery                             
Antigua, West Indies                    
Closed

Atlantida Dolphinarium                    
St. Martin, Dutch West Indies      
Never Opened

Connyland Dolphinarium               
Liperswil, Switzerland                   
Closed

San Juan Dolphinarium                    
San Juan, Puerto Rico             
Never Opened

Dolphin Lagoon                                 
Maldives Islands                         
Never Opened

Louisville Aquarium                           
Louisville, Kentucky                   
Never Opened


Vodnjan Dolphinarium                    
Vodnjan, Croatia                           
Never Opened












OUR LAST CHANCE TO STOP THE NEW ZEALAND DOLPHIN BECOMING EXTINCT






2 comments:

  1. WONDERFUL WONDERFUL BLOG. I PICK UP SOME USE TWEET STORM!!! Thank you!!! Heidi☆*:.。. o(≧▽≦)o .。.:*☆

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  2. http://www.thepetitionsite.com/249/031/518/say-no-to-quotdolphin-encounterquot-at-pigeon-island/

    ReplyDelete